AAA Study Ranks Young Millennials as the Worst Drivers

Posted on behalf of Henness & Haight on Feb 27, 2017 in Car Accident News

young millennial texting and driving

A new study conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has ranked young millennials between the ages of 19 and 24-years-old as the worst drivers in the nation.

The study analyzed drivers from all age groups to determine which generation engaged in the riskiest behaviors when operating a vehicle, such as texting while driving, running a red light and speeding.

AAA researchers found that more than 88 percent of millennial participants had committed at least one risky behavior while behind the wheel within the previous 30-day period.

Of the 2,511 drivers studied, the percentage of drivers who admitted to speeding, texting while driving or running a red light included:

  • Drivers ages 19 to 24-years-old: 88.4 percent
  • Drivers ages 25 to 39-years-old: 79.2 percent
  • Drivers ages 40 to 59-years-old: 75.2 percent
  • Drivers ages 16 to 18-years-old: 69.3 percent
  • Drivers ages 75-years or older: 69.1 percent
  • Drivers ages 60 to 74-years-old: 67.3 percent

AAA’s study analyzed these dangerous driving behaviors to determine which age groups are most susceptible to take risks while driving. It revealed that more young millennial drivers than those in other groups admitted to committing a traffic offense that jeopardized the safety of other drivers.

Red-light Running

Almost 50 percent of the drivers between the ages of 19 and 24-years-old admitted to driving through a light that had just turned red when they could have safely stopped. Only 36 percent of all other drivers included in the study reported that they had committed the same traffic offense.

However, the majority of young millennial drivers do not find this behavior acceptable. Nearly 14 percent of those between the ages of 19 and 24-years-old that were included in the study considered this behavior as acceptable, while just six percent of all other drivers who were interviewed agreed.

Texting While Driving

Drivers between the ages of 19 and 24-years-old were revealed to be 1.6 times more likely to admit to having read a text message or email when driving a vehicle within the past 30-days.

Drivers of the same age group were also nearly twice as likely as all other drivers to send a text message or email while driving.

Speeding

The study compared participants’ likeliness to drive more than 10 mph over the speed limit. Drivers included in the young millennial group were 1.4 times as likely as all other drivers to violate the posted speed limit on residential streets by at least 10 mph.

Nearly 12 percent of drivers included in the age group of 19 to 24-years-old found speeding over 10 mph to be acceptable, compared to less than five percent of all other drivers that also agreed.

These findings come at a time when traffic fatalities have increased every year since 2014. The National Safety Council revealed that the preliminary number of deaths caused by auto accidents amounted to approximately 40,000 in 2016.

Traffic safety officials at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration believe the increasing number of fatal auto accidents were, in part, caused by an improved economy that allowed more people to drive longer distances.

However, other factors, such as dangerous driving behaviors, have also contributed to the high number of fatalities. If you were injured or lost a loved one because of a negligent driver, you may have options to receive compensation for any damages that resulted from the collision. Our Las Vegas auto accident attorneys can review your potential options through a free, no obligation consultation and will charge you no legal fees unless your case has a successful outcome.

Call 844.613.6275 or fill out a Free Case Evaluation form to get started.